Dinosaur senior: Huge skeleton will be on display in the history museum

Dinosaur Senior: Huge skeleton of prehistoric beast bigger than a blue whale and heavier than Dippy the diplodocus will be on display at the history museum

  • Titanosaurs were a group of giant, long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs
  • The giant dinosaurs were found on all continents 100 million years ago
  • New exhibition barely fits in the huge 9 meter high Waterhouse Gallery

For those wondering how big the Natural History Museum’s new dinosaur is, the clue is in the name.

A titanosaur skeleton, the most complete remains of a giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be put on display next year.

The exhibit is four times heavier than the museum’s famous Dippy the diplodocus and 40 feet longer than Hope’s blue whale.

Titanosaurs were a diverse group of giant, long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs, found on all continents 100 million years ago

Patagotitan mayorum, to give the titanosaurus its Latin name, barely fits into the huge 9-meter-tall Waterhouse Gallery.

Museum fossils expert Professor Paul Barrett said: ‘Comparable in weight to more than nine African elephants, this star specimen will inspire visitors to care for some of the world’s largest and most fragile creatures, which face similar challenges to survive.’

Titanosaurs were a diverse group of giant, long-necked herbivorous dinosaurs, found on all continents 100 million years ago.

The London Museum’s patagotitan, discovered in South America, was estimated to be 35 meters long and 65 tons in weight. It has been loaned to the UK by Argentina.

A titanosaur skeleton, the most complete remains of a giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be put on display next year

A titanosaur skeleton, the most complete remains of a giant dinosaur ever discovered, will be put on display next year

The London Museum's patagotitan, discovered in South America, was estimated to be 35 meters long and 65 tons in weight.  It has been loaned to the UK by Argentina

The London Museum’s patagotitan, discovered in South America, was estimated to be 35 meters long and 65 tons in weight. It has been loaned to the UK by Argentina

Dr. Alex Burch, the museum’s director of public programs, says: ‘We are so excited that Patagotitan, the most complete giant dinosaur ever discovered, is making its European debut here at the Natural History Museum, the birthplace of the dinosaur.

“Our fascination with dinosaurs provides the ideal opportunity to inspire and educate the next generation about the natural world, empowering them to act for the planet.”

The cast of Patagotitan mayorum was provided to the museum by the Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio (MEF), Argentina.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *